Book  cover image coming in May

     Sound Instruction: Writing Center Theory and Practice
     Volume 4 - ISBN 0-9709895-1-4
     Kellie A. Charron, Editor


  P   U   B   L   I   S   H   E   D  
Spring 2015

    39 ARTICLES,     58 AUTHORS     228 PAGES


Contents
Acknowledgements / iii
No book is written alone. The publisher would like to thank this volume fifty three authors for their willingness to share their findings in Sound Instruction Series, a sister publication of Academic Exchange Quarterly. Special thanks and appreciation go to all of the quarterly peer reviewers for their expertise and time, generously given.

Foreword / v
As writing center professionals, we serve in an array of contexts, separated by geographical spaces yet bound together through our tenacious desire to collaborate and share ideas. This collaborative spirit is evidenced by the supportive networks we have nurtured through the Wcenter listserv, conferences, and local regional gatherings. Nestled within these dialogic venues, we eagerly share theoretical stances, experiences, tutoring strategies, and day-to-day practices. Writing Center Theory and Practice, Sound Instruction’s first book devoted entirely to sharing the contributions of writing center professionals, captures the essence of our many collaborations as authors from across a diverse spectrum of institutions offer sound advice, address issues, share strategies, and reveal research results.

Unlike most writing center books that tend to focus primarily on theory to inform practice, Writing Center Theory and Practice provides a unique resource full of examples that illustrate how writing center professionals apply theories by describing their practices. In a compendium of thirty-nine examples, authors highlight how they have tackled economic, demographic, and technological challenges. As you read about their experiences, note how the qualitative and empirical studies, pedagogical strategies, and triangulated analyses of theory, practice, and writing center experiences add valuable new knowledge to our discipline. As you learn about contributors’ research-based, innovative methods, you may be challenged to rethink your existing theoretical stances, strengthen your resolve about your current approaches, or be inspired to try new strategies.

Sound Instruction’s focus on writing center studies acknowledges the importance of writing center scholarship in the academy. This collection reveals results of rich conversations that are often initiated around our table during staff meetings, in tutor trainings, or at conferences. Through talking, researching, and implementing new tutoring strategies and practices, these authors provide fresh perspectives and practical approaches—yet the conversation should not end within the confines of this written discourse. I hope that reading Writing Center Theory and Practice prompts you to continue the conversation by responding to authors, conducting research, or by generating innovations in your own centers. By extending the conversation, you help nurture our discipline’s signature circle of collaboration. Your response to this collection can provoke new discussions and applications, thus enriching the growing body of knowledge in writing center studies.

Karen Johnson
Director of the Writing Studio, Shippensburg University, PA


Preface / vii
Sound Instruction: Writing Center Theory and Practice Volume IV demonstrates the scholarship of writing center directors and administrators, as well as those professional tutors and graduate students who strive towards a belief that writing, inherently, is a social act.

Yet where, and more importantly how, centers for writing should – and do – exist remain uncertain, and in some instances, controversial. The contributors to Sound Instruction: Writing Center Theory and Practice work to delve into this matter with creative sapience.

For instance, in “Kairos and Statis in Writing Center Administration,” Erica Cirillo-McCarthy of Stanford University expounds on the issue of budgetary constraints, “braiding together” both kairos and statis theory to present a “pathway towards writing center sustainability.” Similarly, J.C. Lee, Nancy Caronia, and Diane Beltran discuss approaches and attitudes towards writing center outreach, particularly amid rampant misconceptions concerning writing centers’ offerings for both faculty and students. They contend that the university system as a whole will benefit from a new understanding of the writing center’s inherent mission.

It can readily be argued that peer tutors are, at their finest, cross-disciplinary. At their respective institutions, Nicole Caswell and Courtney Werner administered a survey to 122 tutor participants to learn more about how professional development opportunities would work to strengthen tutorly identities. Going a step further, “Using Archival Date to Examine Mandatory Visits” assesses how maintaining records of student visits fuels empirical research and suggests that required visits actually encourage writing center use. Similarly, in “Writing Well: Isn’t it about Time?” Antony Ricks of Alabama A&M University and Kim Roberts of Athens State University posit, “greater success in college writing is achieved when student writers receive feedback multiple times.” They reached their astute conclusions via a nine-month-long study conducted to determine methods of improving writing among upper-division university students.

The question of where writing centers could and should exist is examined in both Liliana Naydan, Joshua Kim, and Drake Misek’s “The Problem of Simulation in Video-Chat Tutoring,” and in Christopher Thurley’s “The Paperless Writing Center: The Effective Paradox.” Naydan et.al bring the conversation into the virtual realm by addressing synchronous online tutorials. The authors argue the following: that “replicating face-to-face tutorials wrongly privileges approaches widely used in in- person consultations, denies [the] reality of online discourse, and ignores ways by which online tutoring can inform traditional writing center practice.” In his own work, Thurley seems to concur with the former’s findings by crafting an evaluative and analytical assessment, which emphasizes the “importance of adaptation” in the modern writing center.

In building on the above queries of where the writing center “fits” and what trials it faces, I am pleased to present the following thirty-nine articles. In addition to exploring theory, practice, and experience, these articles also consider how writing center professionals cope with the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic, technological, and demographic challenges.

The content of Sound Instruction: Writing Center Theory and Practice focuses on four areas: Outreach and Sustainability, Evaluative Assessments, Tutor Training, and Leadership Practices.

* * *

This volume grew out of the hundreds of articles in the Winter 2012-2014 issues of Academic Exchange Quarterly, a double-blind peer-reviewed, scholarly print publication since 1997.

Kellie A. Charron, M.A., University of Rhode Island (2005)


Chapter 1: Outreach and Sustainability / 1
Kairos & Stasis in Writing Center Administration / 2
Interdisciplinary Writing Center Collaborations / 8
Don’t Knock the Hustle: HBCU Writing Center Life / 13
Writing Center Leadership: an Empirical Study / 18
Distributing Leadership Across the Curriculum / 24
Leadership as Organizing in the Writing Center / 29
Pre-Service Volunteer Tutors in a Writing Center / 34
Composing Collaboration: An Integrative Pedagogy / 39
Writing Center Sustainability Through Research / 44

Chapter 2: Evaluative Assessments / 50
Writing Tutoring Boosts Skills and Confidence / 51
The Paperless Writing Center: The Effective Paradox / 63
Activities for Tutor Identity Development / 68
Writing Well: Isn't it about Time? / 74
Using Archival Data to Examine Mandatory Visits / 80
On-line Tutorials: Opportunities and Challenges / 87
Getting the Writing Center into FYC Classrooms / 93
Faculty perceptions of a new writing center / 99
Nondirective Questioning and Student Revision / 104
Writing Center for Credit: A Correlation Study / 110
The Writing Center Coaching Model / 115
Differentiating Maximum Values in Writing Centers / 122
Tutoring, Jouissance, and Correction Static / 127

Chapter 3: Tutor Training / 132
Teaching Literacy through Interpersonal Skills Training / 133
The Problem of Simulation in Video-Chat Tutoring / 139
Using Reflective Exercises in Tutor Training / 144
ESL Training for Writing Center Tutors / 149
Writing Tutor Development Through Peer Mentoring / 154
Age and Peer Status in Writing Center Conferences / 159
Graduate Instructors in the Writing Center / 164
Training Manuals and Reflective Practice / 168
Writing Center Training through Triangulation / 173
Gender and the Writing Center / 178
150 Seconds: Opening a Writing Center Session 185

Chapter 4: Leadership Practices / 190
A Relational Orientation Toward gWPA Leadership / 191
Teacher Commentary Via Speech Recognition / 197
The Mediating Lens of the Online Writing Studio / 203
Swing Out, Studios, and Safety: Writing as Dance / 208
The Writing Center, Transformed / 213
Writing Centers and Graduate Student Leadership / 218

Author Index / 224
A
Aikens, Kristina -   p.154

B
Beltran, Diane Quaglia -  p.8 
Bennett, B. Cole -   p.208
Bourelle, Tiffany -   p.178 
Boyd, Janet -  p.122           
Bruce, Shanti -    p.93 

C
Caronia, Nancy -  p.8 
Carpenter, Russell G. -  p.39          
Caswell, Nicole I. -  p.68
Cirillo-McCarthy, Erica -  p.2          
Colombini, Crystal Broch  -  p.191     

D     
Dennen, Leslie -   p.110
Devet, Bonnie -   p.173
Diab, Rula L. -  p.99
Drager, Micheal W. -     p.51    
Duffy, W. Keith-   p.197
Dvorak, Kevin –  p.93 
Dyehouse, Jeremiah -   p.44    

E
Eleftheriou, Maria -   p.87
Ewing, Laura A. -   p.168      

F    
Finer, Bryna Siegel -  p.44

G
Girgensohn, Katrin -  p.18

H
Heffner, Jessica -   p.159          
Howard, Jeffrey -  p.164

J
Jackson, Karen Keaton -  p.13         
Jensen, Erin B. -  p.34
Johnson, Karen Gabrielle -   p.51
Johnson, Peggy -   p.133,  p.144

K
Kennell, Vicki R. -   p.149
Kim, Joshua -  p.139

L
Langbehn, Karen -   p.168      
Lawson, Daniel -   p.127
Lee, J.C. -  p.8
Lenaghan, Elizabeth -  p.218
Lutkewitte, Claire -    p.93 

M
Mattison, Michael -  p.185   
Miley, Michelle -   p.203
Misek, Drake -  p.139
Mohamad, Mutiara -  p.122       

N  
Naydan, Liliana M. – p.29,    p.139
Niiler, Luke -  p.213

O
Ott, Holly K. -     p.51    

P                                        
Pantelides, Kate -   p.168
Peak, Charity S. -   p.115     

R    
Ricks, Antony N. -  p.24,    p.74
Roberts, Kim C. -    p.74

S
Sweeney, Meghan A. -  p.191     

T   
Thurley, Christopher W. -  p.63

V
Valley, Leslie -  p.39

W
Weathers, John -   p.115        
Werner, Courtney L. -   p.68,  p.159   
White-Farnham, Jamie -   p.44   

Y     
Youn-Kyung Kim -  p.104         
Young, Beth Rapp -  p.80 

School Index / 226
A
Abilene Christian University  p.208
Alabama A&M University, AL  p.74
American University of Sharjah, UAE  p.87
Athens State University, AL  p.24,  p.74

C
California State University, Northridge  p.8
Central College, IA  p.127
College of Charleston, SC  p.173

E
East Carolina University, NC  p.68
Eastern Kentucky University  p.39
European University Viadrina, Germany  p.18

F
Fairleigh Dickinson University  p.  122

G
Gaston College, NC  p.63

H
Hope College, MI  p.68,  p.159

K
Kent State University, OH   p.159

L
Lebanese American University, Lebanon  p.99

N
North Carolina Central University  p.13
Northwestern University, IL   p.218
Nova Southeastern University  p.93

P
Penn State Abington, PA  p.139
Penn State University, PA  p.139,  p.197
Purdue University, IN  p.149

S
Saint Mary’s University, MN  p.133,  p.144
Shippensburg University, PA  p.51
Spalding University, KY  p.104
Stanford University, CA  p.2

T
Tufts University  p.154

U
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL  p.213
University of Central Florida  p.80
University of Houston   p.205
University of Michigan  p.29,   p.139
University of Nevada, Reno  p.191
University of New Mexico  p.178
University of Rhode Island  p.8
University of San Francisco  p.110
University of South Florida, FL   p.168
University of Utah  p.34
University of Texas at San Antonio  p.191
Utah State University, UT  p.164

W
Wittenberg University, OH   p.185
Back cover /
Unlike most writing center books that tend to focus primarily on theory
to inform practice, Writing Center Theory and Practice provides a
unique resource full of examples that illustrate how writing center
professionals apply theories by describing their practices. In a
compendium of thirty-nine examples, authors highlight how they have
tackled economic, demographic, and technological challenges. As you
read about their experiences, note how the qualitative and empirical
studies, pedagogical strategies, and triangulated analyses of theory,
practice, and writing center experiences add valuable new knowledge
to our discipline. As you learn about contributors’ research-based,
innovative methods, you may be challenged to rethink your existing
theoretical stances, strengthen your resolve about your current
approaches, or be inspired to try new strategies.


See other available order options


Thanks for selecting Academic Exchange Quarterly for your professional needs.



2015 Spring
April/May publication date
   Email questions to
academicexchange3@yahoo.com
with AEX Volume 5 in the subject
Writing Center
Theory and Practice
    book order form

    39 ARTICLES,     58 AUTHORS


See other available order options


   APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION -- "submission numbers" my not be in a numerical order
  1. 5554-5v ... - 3 -... PAabe 3 - - 992 - - v RESEARCH* CENTER
    Writing Tutoring Boosts Skills and Confidence
              Karen Gabrielle Johnson, Shippensburg University, PA
              Holly K. Ott, Shippensburg University, PA
              Michael W. Drager, Shippensburg University, PA
  2. 5530-4z ... - - - ... CAabe 1B - - 964 - - z CENTER-2 ADMINISTRATION
    Kairos & Stasis in Writing Center Administration
              Erica Cirillo-McCarthy, Stanford University, CA
  3. 5527-4z ... - - 1... MNabe 1B - - - - - v z CENTER-2 LITERACY
    Teaching Literacy through Interpersonal Skills Training
              Peggy Johnson, Saint Mary’s University, MN
  4. 5526-4z ... - - - ... NCabe 1B - - - 971 - - z CENTER-2 HOW-TO-ESSAY
    The Paperless Writing Center: The Effective Paradox
              Christopher W. Thurley, Gaston College, NC
  5. 5519-4z ... - - - ... NCabe 2B - - - - - - - - z CENTER-2 TUTORS
    Activities for Tutor Identity Development
              Nicole I. Caswell, East Carolina University, NC
              Courtney L. Werner, Hope College, MI
  6. 5518-4z ... - - - ... ALabp 2B - - 969 - - - z CENTER-2 STUDENT
    Writing Well: Isn't it about Time?
              Antony N. Ricks, Alabama A&M University, AL
              Kim C. Roberts, Athens State University, AL
  7. 5514-4z ... - - - ... RIabe 3B - - 966 - - vz CENTER-2 INTERDISCIPLINARY
    Interdisciplinary Writing Center Collaborations
              J. C. Lee, California State University, Northridge
              Nancy Caronia, University of Rhode Island
              Diane Quaglia Beltran, University of Rhode Island
  8. 5491-4z ... - - 6... FLabe 1B - - 949- - - z CENTER-2 EMPIRICAL
    Using Archival Data to Examine Mandatory Visits
              Beth Rapp Young, University of Central Florida
  9. 5483-4z ... - - - ... MIabe 3B - - - - - - - - z CENTER-2 ONLINE
    The Problem of Simulation in Video-Chat Tutoring
              Liliana M. Naydan, Penn State Abington, PA
              Joshua Kim, Penn State University, PA
              Drake Misek, University of Michigan, MI
  10. 5406-3z ... - - - ... NCabe 1B - - - z LEADERSHIP-12 HOW-TO
    Don’t Knock the Hustle: HBCU Writing Center Life
              Karen Keaton Jackson, North Carolina Central University
  11. 5400-3z ... - - - ... ALabe 1B - - - z LEADERSHIP-12 CENTER
    The Writing Center, Transformed
              Luke Niiler, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
  12. 5399-3z ... - - - ... ILabe1----- LEADERSHIP-12 CENTER
    Writing Centers and Graduate Student Leadership
              Elizabeth Lenaghan, Northwestern University, IL
  13. 5395-3z r ... - - - ... MNabe 1B - - - - - - - - - z CENTER-2 TUTORS
    Using Reflective Exercises in Tutor Training
              Peggy Johnson, Saint Mary’s University, MN
  14. 5389-3z ... - - - ... FCabe 1B - - - - LEADERSHIP-12 CENTER
    Writing Center Leadership: an Empirical Study
              Katrin Girgensohn, European University Viadrina, Germany
  15. 5386-3z ... - - - ... INabe 1B - - - - - - zv CENTER-2 ESL
    ESL Training for Writing Center Tutors
              Vicki R. Kennell, Purdue University, IN
  16. 5374-3z ... - - - ... ALabe 1B - - - LEADERSHIP-12 CENTER
    Distributing Leadership Across the Curriculum
              Antony N. Ricks, Athens State University, AL
  17. 5370-3z ... - - - ... TXabe 2B - - - 845--LEADERSHIP-12 GWPA
    A Relational Orientation Toward gWPA Leadership
              Crystal Broch Colombini, University of Texas at San Antonio
              Meghan A. Sweeney, University of Nevada, Reno
  18. 5364-3z ... - - - ... MAabe 1B - - - - LEADERSHIP-12 MENTORING
    Writing Tutor Development Through Peer Mentoring
              Kristina Aikens, Tufts University
  19. 5356-3z ... - - - ... MIabe 2B - - - - - - - - z CENTER-2 TUTORS
    Age and Peer Status in Writing Center Conferences
              Courtney L. Werner, Hope College, MI
              Jessica Heffner, Kent State University, OH
  20. 5355-3z ... - - - ... FCabe 1B - - 835 - - - z CENTER-2 WEB
    On-line Tutorials: Opportunities and Challenges
              Maria Eleftheriou, UAE, American University of Sharjah
  21. 5346-3z ... - - - ... UTabe 1B - - - vz CENTER-2 GRADUATE
    Graduate Instructors in the Writing Center
              Jeffrey Howard, Utah State University, UT
  22. 5340-3z ... - - - ... MIabe 1B - - - - LEADERSHIP-12 CENTER-2
    Leadership as Organizing in the Writing Center
              Liliana M. Naydan, University of Michigan
  23. 5312-3l ... - - - ... PAabe 1B - 795 - - j z HOW-TO CENTER-2
    Teacher Commentary Via Speech Recognition
              W. Keith Duffy, The Pennsylvania State University
  24. 5247-2z ... - - - ... UTabe 1B-------z CENTER-2 SERVICE
    Pre-Service Volunteer Tutors in a Writing Center
              Erin B. Jensen, University of Utah
  25. 5243-2z ... - - - ... FLabe 3B-732---z CENTER-2 UNDERGRADUATE
    Getting the Writing Center into FYC Classrooms
              Kevin Dvorak, Nova Southeastern University
              Shanti Bruce, Nova Southeastern University
              Claire Lutkewitte, Nova Southeastern University
  26. 5233-2z ... - - - ... IAabe 1B-------z CENTER-2 TUTORS
    Tutoring, Jouissance, and Correction Static
              Daniel Lawson, Central College, IA
  27. 5232-2z ... - - - ... FCabe 1B-------z CENTER-2 FACULTY
    Faculty perceptions of a new writing center
              Rula L. Diab, Lebanese American University, Lebanon
  28. 5230-2z ... - - - ... KYabe 1B-730---z CENTER-2 TUTORS
    Nondirective Questioning and Student Revision
              Youn-Kyung Kim, Spalding University, KY
  29. 5209-2z ... - - - ... FLabe 3B-------z CENTER-2 COLLABORATION
    Training Manuals and Reflective Practice
              Kate Pantelides, University of South Florida, FL
              Laura A. Ewing, University of South Florida, FL
              Karen Langbehn, University of South Florida, FL
  30. 5206-2z ... - - - ... TXabe 1B-------z CENTER-2 WRITING
    The Mediating Lens of the Online Writing Studio
              Michelle Miley, University of Houston Writing Center
  31. 5187-2z ... - - - ... SCabp 1B-------z CENTER-2 PEDAGOGY
    Writing Center Training through Triangulation
              Bonnie Devet, College of Charleston, SC
  32. 5026-1z ... - - 1 ... ARabe 1B-581---z CENTER-2 GENDER
    Gender and the Writing Center
              Tiffany Bourelle, University of New Mexico
  33. 4993-1z ... - - - ... TXabe 1B-------z CENTER-2 ZEITGEIST
    Swing Out, Studios, and Safety: Writing as Dance
              B. Cole Bennett, Abilene Christian University
  34. 4975-1z ... - - - ... OHabe 1--------z CENTER-2 METHODOLOGY
    150 Seconds: Opening a Writing Center Session
              Michael Mattison, Wittenberg University, Springfield, OH
  35. 4966-1z ... - - 2 ... CAabp 1B-------z CENTER-2 WRITING
    Writing Center for Credit: A Correlation Study
              Leslie Dennen, University of San Francisco
  36. 4957-1z ... 2 - - ... COabe 2B-574---z CENTER-2 WRITING
    The Writing Center Coaching Model ---2fig---2011-win
              Charity S. Peak, United States Air Force Academy
              John Weathers, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
  37. 4943-1z ... - - - ... KYabe 2B-537---z CENTER-2 WRITING
    Composing Collaboration: An Integrative Pedagogy
              Russell G. Carpenter, Eastern Kentucky University
              Leslie Valley, Eastern Kentucky University
  38. 4941-1z r ... - - - ... NJabe 2B-565---z CENTER-2 WRITING
    Differentiating Maximum Values in Writing Centers
              Janet Boyd, Fairleigh Dickinson University
              Mutiara Mohamad, Fairleigh Dickinson University
  39. 4856-1z r ... - - - ... VTabe 3B--472---z CENTER-2 COLLABORATION
    Writing Center Sustainability Through Research
              Bryna Siegel Finer, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
              Jamie White-Farnham, University of Wisconsin-Superior
              Jeremiah Dyehouse, University of Rhode Island

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  1. ooo
Inclusion criteria for Sound Instruction books
    The primary criteria for selection are
  • topic relevance: Writing Center Theory and Practice for Volume 4 - ISBN 0-9709895-1-4
  • anticipated level of interest and impact e.g., more than one of the following:
    • demonstrates a useful practice that teachers from all disciplines would benefit from
    • describes classroom attitudes and behaviors from various perspectives
    • formulates a novel and interesting idea that appears to be a very effective teaching tool
    • illustrates ideas that can be applied to other disciplines and courses
    • offers succinct and clear style, enjoyable to read
    • provides exposition and explicating both sides of the issue
    • motivates teachers to rethink how they communicate directions and expectations
    • exemplifies current scholarly trends
    • deals with a significant, vital issue in education
    • adds to our knowledge of the challenges in helping ‘behind the times’ faculty
    • makes a significant original contribution to the field
    • contains elements which have general application
    • presents an innovative approach toward dealing with significant teaching issues
  • The above examples, in no particular order, are from AEQ reviewers' recommendations.
  • Thank you for considering Sound Instruction books for your professional needs.
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Vol.4 Timeline/Benchmarks    (for internal use only)
red highlight – to be done by editor
0 what editor when pub
1 article updates ..... ..... OK
2 book layout: vol 1 or 2 or other ? feb-20 .....
3 editor or co-editors ? feb-20 .....
4 book front cover ? feb-20 .....
5 abstracts: 39 after postal let ..... .....
6 chapters - how many ? feb-20 .....
7 book back cover blurb 100+words feb-23 .....
8 handout 1-page feb-23 .....
9 author Index    ? feb-23 .....
10 subject index    ? feb-23 .....
11 preface any length mar-2 .....
12 page proofs by pub ..... OK
13 printer:   mar-apr 2015 n/a ..... OK
14 pub out:   apr-may 2015 n/a ..... OK
March 2015